UM News https://www.um.edu.mo/ $title pt_pt hourly 1<![CDATA[UM professor’s work selected for translation and international circulation by National Social Sciences Fund of China]]> https://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/46910https://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/46910According to an announcement of the National Office for Philosophy and Social Sciences, Pingcheng Era of the Northern Wei Dynasty (third edition), written by Prof Li Ping, advisory editor of Review of Culture edited by the University of Macau (UM) Centre for Macau Studies, has been included in a list of books for translation and international circulation by the National Social Sciences Fund of China (NSSFC). Books on this list will be translated into foreign languages and published outside China by authoritative publishing houses, with the aim of increasing China’s international academic influence and deepening academic exchange between China and foreign countries. 


For full version, please refer to the Chinese version.

Source: Centre for Macau Studies

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<![CDATA[From a Scientist to an Educator Rector Yonghua Song’s Philosophy of Education]]> https://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/46911https://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/46911Prof Yonghua Song is a scientist by training and an electrical engineer by profession. Yet he feels called to a different and higher mission: to turn out identifiable talent for the country and a better world. This higher purpose now defines his life. To his scientific mind, his pre-UM personal story is divided into three stages: schooling, going abroad, and returning home. On 9 January 2018, the day he took over as UM’s new rector, the fourth stage of his life began. Henceforth he will call upon his past experience and every fiber of his being to lead this university to its destiny. To him, the rectorship is not simply a job; it is a mission which he was born to fulfill. His actions and words demonstrate that he is ready for the challenge.

 

A Boy from the Village

Born in January 1964 in a dirt-poor village in Bazhong city, Sichuan province, Rector Song, along with his family, saw learning as the only ticket out of their inter-generational poverty. His parents, by the sweat of their brow, did the impossible--they put him through college. His mother proudly remembers the day when he started school at the age of six, then unheard of in their village. Soon, he became a famous bookworm. He devoured books. He digested what he read. He had no time for anything else.

Later in life, in media interviews, he would tell the world that the hardships of the hills taught him never to stop trying to better his life, that no difficulties are insurmountable, and that success comes one small step at a time. By age 16, his hard work had paid off; Song made it past the gates of Chengdu University of Science and Technology. By 1989, he earned his PhD from the China Electric Power Research Institute, becoming the first person in his village to hold a doctoral degree. Two years later, another PhD degree followed, this time from the nation’s top-ranked Tsinghua University. Song was flying high. Then something happened that was entirely serendipitous. In 1989, he presented an article at an international academic conference in Beijing. It ignited the interest of certain scholars in attendance. Two years later, they invited him to the United Kingdom to deliver a series of lectures. That accidental opportunity proved a turning point in life. Thus began the second stage of his life.

 

Getting Acclimatised to a New Environment

Song was to spend more than a decade in the UK. Those ten years saw the full flowering of his professional career; he came to the attention of academia and industry alike. His career, however, did not take the conventional route favoured by Chinese students who studied overseas and who usually sought gainful employment upon graduation. In Song’s case, he began as a visiting scholar of the Royal Society at the University of Bristol. From that tentative position, he managed to secure concurrent appointments in teaching and research at several universities. He soon graduated to administrative and managerial roles. But it was not all roses and sunshine, as he recalled in a later article describing those bittersweettimes. ‘When I arrived in the UK, culture shock hit me hard,’ he said in the article. ‘All alone in a new country, I found myself surrounded by total strangers. Nothing came easy. But I realised that attitude was everything. I stayed upbeat and positive. In my early days in the UK, the only avenue open to me were some academic exchange activities where I introduced my research work in China to local scholars. Only later was I able to do research and teaching at local universities. ‘

Looking back on that chapter of his life, Rector Song says, ‘No matter where you are or what job you do, you should try your best to integrate into the local society. You must not be removed from reality or be trapped in your own subjectivity. Instead, you must try to see the world from the local point of view and melt into the local community. Don’t wait for the world to come to you.’ He likes to say: ‘If you do not integrate, you cannot operate.’ He is a man who obviously practices what he preaches. At UM, no sooner had he warmed his seat than he began calling on government departments and representatives from all walks of life to solicit their suggestions for a better UM. Within a few short months, in June 2018, he was elected the first president and spokesperson for an alliance dedicated to training bilingual professionals in Chinese and Portuguese, an election that spells implicit trust in the new leader.

 

The First Chinese Pro-Vice-Chancellor of a British University

A perfectionist, Rector Song is like the late British Prime Minister Winston Churchill who was famous for saying that ‘I have a very simple taste. I only want the best.’ Success, however, takes know-how and hard work. But he was prepared to be the best. When in 1997 he was appointed professor of electronic and computer engineering by Brunel University, he was only 33 years old, becoming the youngest Chinese professor of engineering in British history. Better things were to follow. In 2004, he was elected fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering, another unprecedented honour for an expatriate scholar. That same year, he was appointed pro-vice-chancellor for graduate studies at Brunel University, the highest post ever occupied by a Chinese academic. It was the exclamation point of his career in the UK. In 2007, the University of Liverpool lured him away to serve as pro-vice-chancellor and cross-appointed him as the executive vice president of Xi’an Jiatong-Liverpool University in Suzhou, China. In his own discipline, Rector Song’s research in electrical power systems, specifically in energy, information, and control engineering, has promoted the development of the electric power industry. The research team he led has yielded fruitful results which have been adopted and applied by such industrial powerhouses as the National Grid UK, and Siemens. He became such an authority on the subject that the governments of Russia, Italy, Czech Republic, and Australia have all consulted him when constructing electric grids in their countries.

Looking back, Rector Songs says, ‘Those years in the senior management at British universities gave me an overview and insights into the workings of higher education and how British universities nurture talent. I began to think how universities in and out of China can benefit from these insights to produce high-calibre graduates. Those years afforded me an opportunity to reflect on higher education and gain practical experience, experience which I hope to draw on in making a contribution to higher education in China.’

 

A Talented Professor Returns Home and Turns Talent Hunter

The year 2009 ushered in the third stage of Rector Song’s life when he was invited to return to China to serve as a professor of electrical engineering at Tsinghua University, and more importantly as the director of an office in charge of recruiting talented people from overseas. In 2012, he became the executive vice president of Zhejiang University and the founding dean of its International Campus, responsible for formulating growth strategies and spearheading the internationalisation of the university, as well as recruiting talented people. Since returning to China, Song has been the driving force in promoting international education and exchange. He has built a network of relationships with many universities in the UK, Europe, the United States, and of course mainland China itself.

Why did Song choose to return to China? This is a question that has been put to him many times during media interviews. The reasons are numerous, the most important being the love of teaching. ‘During my years in the UK, I never gave up teaching. I also have an intimate knowledge of how innovative people are nurtured and I hope to help my country create more high-calibre professionals,’ he says.

 

No Stranger to Macao

There is great clarity in how he sees the challenge before him. ‘Both mainland and Macao are experiencing rapid economic growth. This calls for talented people in various fields who love their homeland, who are innovative, globally competitive and well-versed in cross-cultural communication,’ he says. ‘We need people who possess these qualities and skills to move our society forward. I hope UM will become a magnet for talent. I will tap my many years of managerial experience in higher education to meet this challenge. No stone will be unturned in serving my country and Macao.’

Rector Song spells out the reasons for joining UM. He says, ‘First, UM is the only public comprehensive university in the Macao SAR backed by the Macao SAR government and the community at large. Second, its strategic geographical location in the Pearl River Delta region and the Guangdong-Hong Kong-Macao Greater Bay Area turns it into a cornucopia of opportunity for the university. Third, UM is an international university with an international governance model, staffed by an international faculty team dedicated to innovative education, with ample resources, to make rapid progress in teaching and research possible. Fourth, UM has a well-defined vision and mission I can totally embrace. Finally, my connections with Macao go back a long way. As far back as 2002, I was already serving as an advisor to the Science and Technology Committee of the Macao SAR government. Something else tugs at my heartstrings. The primary school I attended in my hometown in Sichuan province was destroyed by the big earthquake of 2008. The school was later re-built with the money donated by Macao residents. Macao was therefore more than just a name. I had fond feelings for her long before I even set foot here. I’ve always wanted to do something for Macao in return.’

 

Taking Higher Education to New Level

During his first year in office, Rector Song has proved his mettle as an education leader. He says, ‘I am proud of what UM has achieved in teaching and research. I am also very proud of its faculty-based system and the residential colleges to turn out well-rounded students, but we cannot afford to rest on our laurels.’ Going forward, Rector Song believes that a strategic vision society supports is critical to greater success. He believes that this university is destined to greater heights, and Song has the blueprint to take us there. In it, he focuses on four key aspects: (1) fine-tuning our education model to nurture talented students at different levels and in different fields; (2) creating a work environment with harmony at its heart to maximise employee productivity and creativity; (3) turbo-charging collaboration in research to output, innovativeness and social impact; and (4) putting community service high on our agenda and building a better platform to make it happen so as to promote the socioeconomic development of the Macao society.

To Rector Song’s way of thinking, whether a university becomes truly first-class ultimately depends not only on whether it can attract the best scholars and students, but also on whether it can create a positive impact on the local and international communities. UM’s vision is kaleidoscopic: meeting the needs of the rapidly-developing Macao society, offering top-quality education, carrying out innovative research, serving the local community, and becoming a truly international institution. To the question ‘What kind of graduates do we want to produce?’ his answer is simple: They must, first and foremost, be able to meet the needs of the local community. Their heart must inhabit the homeland, but their mind must be globally guided. They must be internationally competitive, intellectually critical and creative and yet socially responsible. In a nutshell, we want to produce future leaders and global citizens.’ Rector Song himself embodies these attributes, with a wealth of experience at high levels in higher education, at home and abroad. He is poised to take the university to a place it has never been. He is acutely aware of the high expectations of our governments, both local and central, and fully feels the weight of responsibility on his shoulders. But here is a leader who is equal to the task, in aptitude and attitude, in determination and sense of destiny.

The year 2019 will mark the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People’s Republic of China and the 20th anniversary of Macao’s return to the motherland. To mark both milestones, Rector Song says UM will organise a series of events to take stock of the past, showcase its current achievements, and plan for a future where the university can make a greater contribution to Macao and China.


Source: umagazine

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<![CDATA[Responsible Gambling Symposium 2018]]> https://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/46902https://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/46902Convite à Imprensa
Nome : Responsible Gambling Symposium 2018
Organizer : University of Macau, Social Welfare Bureau, Gaming Inspection and Coordination Bureau of MSAR Government
Data : 18 December 2018 (Tuesday)
Horário : 10:00am
Venue : JW Marriott Hotel Macau
Conteúdo : Robert Ladouceur, professor emeritus at Laval University in Quebec City, Canada, Mark Griffiths, professor at School of Social Sciences, Nottingham Trent University, United Kingdom and Davis Fong, Director of Institute for the Study of Commercial Gaming, UM are invited to be the keynote speakers. Other speakers from Asia and Macau Casino Operators are also invited to join the panel discussion during the event.
Language : English

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Nome : Communications Office
Tel. Nº : 88228022
Fax : 88222359
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Remark : For car parking reservation, please contact us one day in advance.
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<![CDATA[UM, Brunel University hold joint seminar to discuss technologies for smart city development]]> https://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/46903https://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/46903A joint seminar on big data analytics for smart city was recently held at the University of Macau (UM) Institute of Collaborative Innovation. The event was organised by UM’s State Key Laboratory of Internet of Things for Smart City (SKL-IOTSC), with assistance from Brunel University. During the event, experts and scholars from around the world had an in-depth discussion on technologies for smart city development.

In his speech, UM Rector Yonghua Song said that the seminar aimed to identify scientific and technical hurdles in the development of smart cities and the Internet of Things. He added that UM will focus its efforts on five research areas, namely sensory information and communications system and network safety, urban big data and smart technologies, smart energy, smart transport based on the Internet of Things, and urban public security and emergency management, in order to provide technical support in the development of smart cities for Macao, the Greater Bay Area, and other parts of China.

Prof Gareth Taylor and Prof Maozhen Li from Burnel University and Prof Jia Weijia and Prof Gong Zhiguo from UM delivered talks in the seminar. Scholars from both universities shared their latest research results in the fields of smart grid, smart cities, high-performance parallel processing, big data analysis, and online data mining with participating experts, scholars, engineers, and students.


Source: State Key Laboratory of Internet of Things for Smart City

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<![CDATA[Online Gaming and Addiction in Macao]]> https://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/46904https://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/46904Do you enjoy online gaming? Gaming is one of the most popular online activities in the world, especially among young people. It is estimated that there were 442 million online gamers in China in 2017, an increase of 36.4 per cent when compared to 2011. With such rapid growth in popularity, gaming is no longer mere entertainment. Competitive gaming is a good example; gaming has been included as an officially-recognised sport in the 2022 Asian Games. Specific courses, programmes, and even educational institutions have been established for this new type of sport, such as the eSports Academy in Hong Kong and eSports training center in Overseas Chinese University, Taiwan.

 

Why do people play online games? Despite the flourishing of eSports and other associated businesses, our earlier online survey shows that the most common reason for Chinese people to engage in online gaming is still ‘recreation’. ‘Coping with stress’ and ‘escaping from reality’ are the second and third reasons commonly reported. Indeed, online gaming not only brings fun to gamers but also keeps them psychologically away from daily hassles and problems. This effect, however, can only be temporary and will impose a potential threat to an individual’s well-being if gaming is taken as the sole solution for real-life problems. Our survey provides empirical evidence that people with higher general and escape motives for online gaming are more vulnerable to Internet Gaming Disorder (IGD), which is generally regarded as a specific type of behavioural addiction. The American Psychiatric Association (APA) has classified this disorder as a clinical condition for further study in the fifth edition of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) in 2013. Therefore, a careful look at the potential psychological harm of gaming is warranted. In particular, who is more susceptible to IGD? How is IGD threatening to our well-being? And what can we do to improve the situation? Our research team has interviewed 1000 Macao residents via a telephone survey in order to provide insights for these questions.

 

Defining IGD

Despite the fact that online gaming has greatly increased in popularity, the knowledge regarding its associated addiction and influence is relatively limited, and hence the controversy of defining IGD a mental illness remains heated. The APA tends to classify it as a type of Non-Substance- Related Disorder (also called behavioural addiction, with gambling disorder as another example) but is calling for more empirical evidence before making the final decision. The World Health Organisation has recently defined Gaming Disorder, in the draft 11th Revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11), as a behavioural pattern of digital-gaming (or video-gaming) that is ‘characterised by impaired control over gaming, increasing priority given to gaming over other activities to the extent that gaming takes precedence over other interests and daily activities, and continuation or escalation of gaming despite the occurrence of negative consequences’. This definition is somehow consistent with nine diagnostic symptoms of IGD listed in the DSM-5 by the APA: (i) preoccupation with online gaming; (ii) withdrawal symptoms; (iii) tolerance development; (iv) repeated failure to reduce or quit online gaming; (v) loss of interest in previous hobbies/entertainment; (vi) continued involvement despite knowledge of psychosocial problems; (vii) deception about online gaming involvement; (viii) mood modification via online gaming; and (xi) risking relationships or opportunities. These symptoms are commonly reported by gaming addicts and thus can be used by researchers, including those in our research team, to screen probable problem gamers.

 

Sociodemographic Factors: Age and Sex

What sex or age group is more susceptible to IGD? A systematic review of 37 cross-sectional studies found a large variation of IGD prevalence across populations (0.7% to 27.5%). Since online gaming involvement is relatively higher among young people, it is no surprise to find that the spotlight of the existing literature went to middle school students or adolescent gamers rather than other age groups. Our telephone survey is the first attempt to examine the prevalence of IGD with a representative adult sample in a Chinese community. Based on the survey data, the estimated prevalence was about 2.0 per cent among adult Chinese residents in Macao. Among those who had online gaming experience in the past year, the prevalence was 4.3 per cent, which is comparable to the prevalence estimated among some adolescent gamer samples. Therefore, adult gamers are as vulnerable as adolescent gamers to IGD and thus adequate intervention attention should also be allocated to adult gamers. In addition, men are generally expected to be more susceptible to this disorder than women. Our data, however, did not demonstrate a very big gender difference among our Chinese adults.

 

Psychological Factors: Psychological Distress and Ego Strength

Our survey found that psychological distress such as depression and anxiety were positively associated with IGD. We cannot test their causal relationship but speculate a vicious loop: high psychological distress may predispose online gamers to excessive gaming, while IGD gamers may also have a problematic lifestyle (eg, sleeping deprivation, mental strain, and social isolation) which results in more distress. In addition to risk factors, our survey data also identified protective factors and found that Macao gamers with higher levels of psychological resilience (ie, capability to rebound from adverse situations) and purpose in life (ie, perception of a meaningful life) reported fewer symptoms of IGD. As suggested by positive psychology theories, these positive psychological attributes may protect adult gamers from developing psychosocial problems, including IGD.

 

A Public Health Threat

Given the increasing online gaming involvement of both genders and across age groups, excessive and problematic gaming is a public health threat to our society. Public awareness of such type of addiction and associated problems should be promoted. Future prevention programmes for IGD could work on increasing individuals’ psychological resilience and help them to find their purpose in life. Active coping of psychological distress should also be considered in those programmes. In Macao, further resources should also be allocated to research and intervention programmes. Will ‘responsible gaming’ be an effective strategy for IGD prevention? We look forward to empirical findings to give us the answer.


The author Anise M S Wu is currently a professor of psychology at the University of Macau. Her main research interest is individual and public health, with focus on addictive behaviours (including gambling, gaming, internet use, excessive spend­ing, and substance use), organ donation, volunteerism, and the well-being of older adults.

The author Karlas K H Leong received his bachelor's degree in psychology from the University of Macau in 2017. He is now a research assistant for Prof Wu Man Sze and is actively preparing himself for his future academic career.


Source: umagazine

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<![CDATA[An Eye for Beauty and a Kind Heart Childhood Education Expert Prof Liu Naihua]]> https://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/46896https://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/46896Apart from parents, teachers are probably the most important influence on a child’s growth. Liu Naihua, an assistant professor from the University of Macau’s Faculty of Education, has 30 years of experience in childhood education and research. She believes that what early childhood teachers need the most are an eye for beauty and a kind heart. She says, ‘As teachers, we must always remember our mission—we must respect every life, love every child, and sow the seed of love in the hearts of the children.’

Treating Students as Her Own Children

Over the years, Prof Liu has encountered her fair share of career challenges and setbacks, but the thought of leaving the profession has never crossed her mind. Why? She says, ‘two reasons—interest and a sense of mission. I love to hear children talk and see their innocent smiles. I’m touched by their goodness and thoughtfulness. In this complicated world, you can only experience this kind of pure innocence when you are with children.’

Some UM students praise Prof Liu for always smiling and radiating a positive energy, to which she replies, ‘Love, respect, and caring are what every life needs the most. I want to give all three to my students. So I cherish every moment with them, and I try my best to listen and understand their thoughts.’

 

Appreciating Every Child’s Uniqueness

As an early childhood education teacher, Prof Liu cherishes the trust of her students, and she feels a great sense of satisfaction when students share their innermost thoughts with her. ‘I often tell them, forgive those who have hurt you, because that’s the greatest release. Be grateful to those who have helped you, because then you will be blessed. What early childhood education teachers need the most are an eye for beauty and a kind heart. We must appreciate every child’s uniqueness, and patiently wait for them to grow,’ she says.

Prof Liu often reminds her students not to follow the crowd after entering the job market; rather, they should always remember an educator’s mission, which is respecting every life, loving every child, and sowing the seed of love in the hearts of the children. She believes that teaching is more than just a job; the teacher is an engineer of the human soul and may have a lifelong influence on children.

Commenting on the changes in early childhood education over the years, she says, ‘In the past, early childhood education focused on knowledge acquisition and skill training, while today, the tendency is for teachers to guide students to discover on their own, to practice with their hands, and to develop critical thinking skills, problem-solving skills, and adaptability to new environment. Therefore, research in early childhood education must also reflect this change.’

 

Studying the Learning Corner Approach

In Prof Liu’s opinion, most kindergartens today rely excessively on textbooks. As a consequence, teachers tend to be constrained by textbooks and their curriculum design skills are impaired. To change this situation, five years ago, she started working with a kindergarten in Macao to open a research centre, where they intentionally depart from traditional teaching methods by reducing the number of textbooks and phasing out written exams. This approach is known as the ‘Learning Corner Approach’. Specifically, they devote each learning corner to a different educational function and adopt a multidisciplinary integration approach to cater to children’s interests and satisfy their propensity to touch objects around them with their hands, guiding them to discover and learn through games.

In this Learning Corner Approach, teachers use different kinds of music in place of instructions to signal a change of activities and the desired behaviour expected from the children. Each learning corner serves a different educational function. There are art and craft corner, science corner, Chinese corner, intellectual development corner, toy block corner, and so on. Children can freely choose from the physical teaching aids carefully designed by the teachers, and teachers can assess the children’s learning ability with a multifaceted approach. To ensure a more objective assessment, Prof Liu developed an evaluation system in collaboration with the industry. The system uses a high-tech device to record the children’s learning process in order to help teachers and parents better understand children’s learning abilities and interests. According to Prof Liu, the Learning Corner Approach helps students become self-driven learners. She has noticed a great improvement in the reasoning skills, problem-solving skills, judgment, and observational skills in the children who have benefited from this approach.

 

The Teacher and the Taught Together Create the Learning

Prof Liu says it is not easy to promote the Learning Corner Approach, which originated from Taiwan, because of the need to adjust the teaching strategies to suit local circumstances. Meticulous planning is required in the process, from the division of the classroom to the design of the teaching aid cabinet. While she had the support of the school principal and the head of the kindergarten, some kindergarten teachers were dubious and reluctant to try this new approach. She says, ‘When I tried to promote this Learning Corner Approach, many teachers had no idea what it was, much less how to implement it. So I adjusted the environmental planning course for third-year undergraduates, and spent one semester teaching my students how to implement this approach, and then I divided them into groups and assigned the different groups to the different grades in the kindergarten to demonstrate to teachers there how to use this approach.’

In the first year of implementing the Learning Corner Approach, Prof Liu worked with her students and kindergarten teachers to adjust the teaching environment and content. She recalls, ‘In the second year, I took some of my students who had learned the approach to the kindergarten to demonstrate how to use teaching aids in a way that suits the environment and the subject of learning, to help teachers there become more familiar with this approach. And now, my students would do internships in the kindergarten to learn the approach from teachers there. This way, a virtuous cycle is created. ’

Fong Ka Pou, a Class of 2017 graduate with a degree in pre-school education, now works as a teacher in St Mary Magdalene School (Escola de Santa Madalena). She says, ‘The Learning Corner Approach advocated by Prof Liu can help children learn with teaching aids, thereby stimulating their imagination and creativity. It also caters to the children’s innate tendency to use their hands to interact with the world. In the process, children get to exercise the muscles in their hands and experience the joy of learning at the same time.’

Fong Ka Pou notes that the skills she has learned from Prof Liu, including skills in developing teaching aids, guiding the learning process with questions, and designing and decorating the learning corners, can all be applied to her current job.

 

Students More Motivated to Think and Learn

Leong Teng Kong, a Class of 2009 graduate of the master’s degree programme in education (curriculum and instruction), now works as a teacher in Pui Ching Middle School. He is convinced that Prof Liu’s Learning Corner Approach perfectly suits the children’s developmental needs. He says, ‘Today’s children are spoiled by everyone in the family. And the sad result is that many of them don’t know how to take care of themselves in daily life. Prof Liu’s Learning Corner Approach can make children feel more motivated to think and learn.’

The kindergarten that has adopted the Learning Corner Approach has experimented with different modes of teaching, including the traditional teaching method, the unit teaching method, and the thematic teaching method. Introduced five years ago, the Learning Corner Approach has won favour with kindergarten teachers and parents alike. Lau Iok Leng, the head of the kindergarten, is a fan of this approach, saying, ‘Since we implemented the approach, we have noticed a great improvement in the children’s self-discipline and concentration, so much so that some parents have asked us with curiosity, what did you do to make my kid grow so fast?’

Prof Liu is very confident about the Learning Corner Approach. She says, ‘This approach taps into the children’s learning ability. I am working to improve this approach to make curriculum, teaching, and assessment more closely linked, so I can help children improve their various skills. I hope to promote this teaching approach to all kindergartens in Macao.’


Source: umagazine

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<![CDATA[UM organises Chinese brush painting course for students to promote traditional Chinese culture]]> https://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/46898https://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/46898The University of Macau (UM) Cheong Kun Lun College recently organised a course in Chinese brush painting for students. The event aimed to promote Chinese traditional culture among college members. Outstanding works created by students are now exhibited in the college. The instructor was the renowned Chinese painter and calligraphist Ieong Keang Sang from Macao.

Designed for students with no prior knowledge of Chinese brush painting, the course provided an opportunity for participants to learn the basic techniques, including how to paint with brushes and black ink, execute brush strokes professionally, as well as draw different subjects, especially the ‘Four Gentlemen’, namely plum blossom, orchid, bamboo, and chrysanthemum. In the final stage, the students learned how to paint with coloured ink.


Source: Cheong Kun Lun College

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<![CDATA[UM launches UM-CAT platform to assist professionals in handling large amount of Chinese-Portuguese-English translation tasks]]> https://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/46879https://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/46879The University of Macau (UM) has officially launched UM-CAT, an online Chinese-Portuguese-English computer aided translation platform. The platform allows professional translators to establish specialised vocabulary sets related to a particular industry, handle large translation projects with a division of labour, track the translation progress, and review the final product. The system can also automatically identify previously used texts. The platform are suitable for individuals, government offices, and companies who need to handle a large amount of multilingual translation tasks in their daily work and will help to improve translation efficiency.

UM-CAT was developed by UM’s Natural Language Processing & Portuguese-Chinese Machine Translation Laboratory (NLP2CT). Apart from its core function, automatic translation, this platform also integrates various functions, including translation memory, terminology management, collaborative translation, and intelligent suggestion of translation segments, which enables it to assist in the various aspects of bilingual or trilingual translation between Chinese, Portuguese and English. Moreover, UM-CAT works in translation/proofreading/typesetting mode, which enables flexible division of labour on a case-by-case basis for easy management of different translation tasks. The system can effectively track the translation progress and review the final product to ensure efficiency, accuracy, consistency, and readability, thereby improving translation efficiency. Compared to previous translation systems and platforms, UM-CAT not only can translate generic texts; it can also translate technical texts in different professional fields.

UM’s NLP2CT has long been involved in machine translation research. The lab has launched various innovation technologies, including the PCT, a Chinese/Portuguese translation system; the Um2T, an online interactive Chinese/Portuguese machine translation system; and the smart translation platform. Earlier, an English-Chinese machine translation system developed by UM received the top three prizes as well as the fifth prize at the constraint English-to-Chinese machine translation campaign organised under the 13th China Workshop on Machine Translation (CWMT 2017). Apart from text translation systems, the lab has also developed a conference simultaneous interpreting system. The system can accurately identify the language being spoken and perform simultaneous interpreting to cater to multilingual conferences. The system is currently being tested and is expected to be put into use in the near future. To learn more about the UM-CAT system or to arrange a trial use of the system, please email to nlp2ct@um.edu.mo.



Source: Communications Office  

Media Contact Information:
Communications Office, University of Macau

Albee Lei  Tel:(853) 88228004
Kelvin U  Tel:(853) 88224322
Email:prs.media@um.edu.mo
UM Website:www.um.edu.mo

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<![CDATA[UM, Zhejiang University co-organise seminar on modern college system and talent development]]> https://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/46880https://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/46880A seminar on modern college system and first-rate secondary education was recently held at the University of Macau (UM). The event was co-organised by UM’s Faculty of Education and Zhejiang University’s Center for International Education Research. The seminar attracted over 100 members of senior management of universities and secondary schools in mainland China and Macao, experts, scholars, faculty members and students. During the seminar, education experts gave speeches on talent development strategies as well as modern college system and had in-depth discussions on the transition from secondary education and university education.



For full version, please refer to the Chinese version. 


Source: Communications Office   

Media Contact Information:
Communications Office, University of Macau

Albee Lei  Tel:(853) 88228004
Kelvin U  Tel:(853) 88224322
Email:prs.media@um.edu.mo
UM Website:www.um.edu.mo 

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<![CDATA[Delegation led by Shandong CPPCC Chairman Fu Zhifang visits UM]]> https://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/46885https://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/46885

A delegation led by Fu Zhifang, chairman of Shandong committee of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC), recently visited the University of Macau (UM) and was warmly received by Vice Rectors Lionel Ni and Kou Mei. Both parties plan to strengthen collaboration on academic and research activities between universities in Shandong province and Macao. Fu praised UM for its educational philosophy and research achievements in recent years. He expressed hope to deepen academic exchange and research collaborations between Shandong universities and UM. During the visit, Ni told the guests about UM’s academic development and characteristics, future development directions, and goal to nurture outstanding professionals for the Guangdong-Hong Kong-Macao Grater Bay Area. Members of the delegation visited the UM Wu Yee Sun Library and the State Key Laboratory of Analog and Mixed-Signal VLSI.



For full version, please refer to the Chinese version. 


Source: Communications Office   

Media Contact Information:
Communications Office, University of Macau

Albee Lei  Tel:(853) 88228004
Kelvin U  Tel:(853) 88224322
Email:prs.media@um.edu.mo
UM Website:www.um.edu.mo 

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