Chengxin PAN 潘成鑫

Associate Professor
Master Programme Coordinator (International Relations and Public Policy)



Contact Information

Tel: +853 8822 8965
Office: Room 4007, Humanities and Social Sciences Building (E21B)
E-mail: cxpan@um.edu.mo


  • PhD in Political Science and International Relations, The Australian National University (2005)
  • LL.M. in International Politics, Peking University (1995)
  • Graduate Certificate in Higher Education, Deakin University (2008)
  • LL.B. in International Politics, Peking University (1990)
  • International Relations Theory
  • Quantum relational theory and world politics
  • China’s international relations
  • Representing and theorizing China’s rise
  • US-China relations
  • Australia-China relations
  • Chengxin Pan and Emilian Kavalski eds. (2022, in press) China’s Rise and Rethinking International Relations Theory. Bristol: Bristol University Press.
  • Chengxin Pan and Emilian Kavalski (2022, in press) ‘The Rise of China and Its Challenges to International Relations Theory’, in Chengxin Pan and Emilian Kavalski eds., China’s Rise and Rethinking International Relations Theory. Bristol: Bristol University Press, pp. 1-19.
  • Chengxin Pan (2022, in press) ‘China’s Rise as Holographic Transition: A Relational Challenge to IR’s Newtonian Ontology’, in Chengxin Pan and Emilian Kavalski eds., China’s Rise and Rethinking International Relations Theory. Bristol: Bristol University Press, pp. 210-233.
  • Emilian Kavalski and Chengxin Pan (2022, in press) ‘Towards International Relations beyond Binaries’, in Chengxin Pan and Emilian Kavalski eds., China’s Rise and Rethinking International Relations Theory. Bristol: Bristol University Press, pp. 234-244.
  • Chengxin Pan and Matthew Clarke (2022, in press) ‘Narrating the South Pacific in and beyond Great Power Politics’, East Asia: An International Quarterly. DOI: 10.1007/s12140-021-09383-w
  • Chengxin Pan and Linus Hagström (2021) ‘Ontological (In)Security and Neoliberal Governmentality: Explaining Australia’s China Emergency’, Australian Journal of Politics and History (Special Issue: ‘Framing and Reframing Australia’s China Debate’). DOI: 10.1111/ajph.12785
  • Chengxin Pan (2021) ‘Reclaiming Substances in Relationalism: Quantum Holography and Substance-based Relational Analysis in World Politics’. Millennium: Journal of International Studies 49(3): 577-603. (Special Issue: ‘Entanglements and Detachments in Global Politics’).
  • Baogang He, David Hundt and Chengxin Pan eds. (2021) China and Human Rights in North Korea: Debating a “Developmental Approach” in Northeast Asia. London: Routledge.
  • Baogang He, Chengxin Pan, and David Hundt (2021) ‘A Developmental Approach to North Korea’s Human Rights Problem: Lessons from China?’, in Baogang He, David Hundt and Chengxin Pan eds., China and Human Rights in North Korea: Debating a “Developmental Approach” in Northeast Asia. London: Routledge, pp. 3-21.
  • Chengxin Pan (2021) ‘A Development-based Approach to Human Rights: The Case of China and Its Implications for North Korea’, in Baogang He, David Hundt and Chengxin Pan eds., China and Human Rights in North Korea: Debating a “Developmental Approach” in Northeast Asia. London: Routledge, pp. 75-97.
  • Chengxin Pan (2021) ‘Racialised Politics of (In)Security and the COVID-19 Westfailure’. Critical Studies on Security 9(1): 40-45.
  • Chengxin Pan (2020), ‘Enfolding Wholes in Parts: Quantum Holography and International Relations’. European Journal of International Relations (25th Anniversary Special Issue ‘Interdisciplinarity and the IR Innovation Horizon’) 26(S1): 14-38.
  • Marcos S. Scauso, Arlene B. Tickner, Garrett FitzGerald, Navnita Chadha Behera, Chengxin Pan, Chih-yu Shih and Kosuke Shimizu (2020) ‘COVID-19, Democracies, and (De)Colonialities’. Democratic Theory 7(2): 82-93.
  • Linus Hagström and Chengxin Pan (2020), ‘Traversing the Soft/Hard Power Binary: The Case of the Sino-Japanese Territorial Dispute’, Review of International Studies 46(1): 37-55.
  • Chengxin Pan, Benjamin Isakhan, and Zim Nwokora (2020), ‘Othering as Soft-Power Discursive Practice: China Daily’s Construction of Trump’s America in the 2016 Presidential Election’, Politics 40(1): 54-69.
  • Zim Nwokora, Benjamin Isakhan, and Chengxin Pan (2020), ‘The Real Fourth Estate? Portrayals of Trump’s Rise in the Foreign Media of Friendly Countries’, Policy Studies.
  • Chengxin Pan, Matthew Clarke, and Sophie Loy-Wilson (2019). ‘Local Agency and Complex Power Shifts in the Era of Belt and Road: Perceptions of Chinese Aid in the South Pacific’, Journal of Contemporary China 28(117): 385-399.
  • Benjamin Isakhan, Zim Nwokora and Chengxin Pan (2019), ‘Perceptions of Democracy and the Rise of Donald Trump: A Framing Analysis of Saudi Arabian Media.’  Global Media and Communication 15(2): 159-175.
  • Chengxin Pan and Emilian Kavalski (2018), ‘Theorizing China’s Rise in and beyond International Relations’, International Relations of the Asia-Pacific 18(3): 289-311.
  • Chengxin Pan (2018) ‘Toward a New Relational Ontology in Global Politics: China’s Rise as Holographic Transition’, International Relations of the Asia-Pacific 18(3): 339-367.
  • Chengxin Pan (2018) ‘Identity Politics and the Poverty of Diplomacy: China in Australia’s 2017 Foreign Policy White Paper’, Security Challenges 14(1): 13-20.
  • Chengxin Pan (2018) ‘The “China” Challenge as Transnational Challenge: Implications for Contemporary U.S.-China Relations’, Journal of China and International Relations 6(2): 34-49 (in Chinese).
  • Chengxin Pan and Oliver Turner (2017) ‘Neoconservatism as Discourse: Virtue, Power and US Foreign Policy’, European Journal of International Relations, 23(1): 74-96.
  • Mark Chou, Chengxin Pan and Avery Poole (2017), ‘The Threat of Autocracy Diffusion in Consolidated Democracies? The Case of China, Singapore and Australia’, Contemporary Politics, 23(2): 175-194.
  • Chengxin Pan (2016) ‘Discourses of American “Global Leadership”: Misperception and Critical Reflection’. Fudan American Review, No. 2, pp. 58-77 (in Chinese).
  • Chengxin Pan (2016) ‘China Anxieties in the Geopolitical Cartographies of the “Indo-Pacific”’, in Priya Chacko ed., The New Regional Geopolitics of the Indo-Pacific: Drivers, Dynamics and Consequences. New York and London: Routledge, pp. 97-113.
  • Chengxin Pan and David Walker eds. (2015) Australia and China: Challenges and Ideas in Cross-cultural Engagement. Beijing: China Social Sciences Press (in English).
  • Chengxin Pan (2015) ‘Cross-cultural Literacy as Social Knowledge: Implications for Australia’s Understanding of China’, in Chengxin Pan and David Walker (eds.), Australia and China: Challenges and Ideas in Cross-cultural Engagement. Beijing: China Social Sciences Press, pp. 308-27.
  • Chengxin Pan (2015) ‘Australia’s Self-identity and Three Modes of Imagining Asia: A Critical Perspective on “Asia Literacy”,’ in Christine Halse (ed.), Asia Literate Schooling in the Asian Century, London: Routledge, pp. 197-210.
  • Chengxin Pan (2014) ‘The “Indo-Pacific” and Geopolitical Anxieties about China’s Rise in the Asian Regional Order’, Australian Journal of International Affairs, 68(4): 453-469.
  • Chengxin Pan (2014) ‘Rethinking Chinese Power: A Conceptual Corrective to the “Power Shift” Narrative’, Asian Perspective, 38(3): 387-410.
  • Chengxin Pan (2013) ‘Knowing Asia and Re-imagining the Australian Self’, Curriculum Perspectives, 33(3): 77-79.
  • Chengxin Pan (2013) ‘The Asian/Chinese Century from the Chinese Perspective’, Griffith Asia Quarterly, 1(1): 30-52.
  • Chengxin Pan (2012) Knowledge, Desire and Power in Global Politics: Western Representations of China’s Rise, Cheltenham, UK; Northampton, MA, USA: Edward Elgar. Chinese edition:《国际政治中的知识、欲望与权力:中国崛起的西方叙事》(张旗译),社会科学文献出版社,2016年版.
  • Chengxin Pan (2012) ‘Getting Excited about China’, in David Walker and Agnieszka Sobocinska (eds.), Australia’s Asia: From Yellow Peril to Asian Century, Crawley, WA: UWA Publishing, pp. 245-266.
  • Chengxin Pan (2012) ‘Problematizing “Constructive Engagement” in EU China Policy,’ in C. Roland Vogt (ed.), Europe and China: Strategic Partners or Rivals?, Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press, pp. 37-57.
  • Chengxin Pan (2012) ‘Normative Convergence and Cross-Strait Divergence: Westphalian Sovereignty as an Ideational Source of the Taiwan Conflict,’ in Jean-Marc F. Blanchard and Dennis V. Hickey (eds.), New Thinking about the Taiwan Issue: Theoretical Insights into Its Origins, Dynamics, and Prospects, London: Routledge, pp. 28-47.
  • Chengxin Pan (2011) ‘Shu and the Chinese Quest for Harmony: A Confucian Approach to Mediating Across Difference,’ in Morgan Brigg and Roland Bleiker (eds.), Mediating Across Difference: Oceanic and Asian Approaches to Conflict Resolution, Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2011, pp. 221-47.
  • Chengxin Pan (2010) ‘Westphalia and the Taiwan Conundrum: A Case against the Exclusionist Construction of Sovereignty and Identity,’ Journal of Chinese Political Science, 15(4): 371-389.
  • Chengxin Pan (2009) ‘What Is Chinese about Chinese Businesses? Locating the “Rise of China” in Global Production Networks’, Journal of Contemporary China, 18(58): 7-25.
  • Chengxin Pan (2009) ‘“Peaceful Rise” and China’s New International Contract: The State in Change in Transnational Society’, in Linda Chelan Li (ed.), The Chinese State in Transition: Processes and Contests in Local China, London: Routledge, pp. 127-44.
  • Chengxin Pan (2008) ‘Is China’s Rise a Threat? Understanding the “China” Challenge,’ in Sally Totman and Scott Burchill (eds.), Global Crises and Risks, South Melbourne: Oxford University Press, pp. 120-37
  • Chengxin Pan (2008) ‘Contractual Thinking and Responsible Government in China: A Constructivist Framework for Analysis,’ The China Review, 8(2): 49-75.
  • Chengxin Pan (2006) ‘Neoconservatism, U.S.-China Conflict, and Australia’s “Great and Powerful Friends” Dilemma’, The Pacific Review, 19(4): 429-48.
  • Chengxin Pan (2004) ‘The “China Threat” in American Self-Imagination: The Discursive Construction of Other as Power Politics’, Alternatives: Global, Local, Political, 29(3): 305-331.

Dr Chengxin Pan is Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Macau, Adjunct Associate Professor at the Australia-China Relations Institute, University of Technology Sydney, and a co-editor of the Global Political Sociology book series (Palgrave Macmillan). He previously taught International Relations at Deakin University, and held visiting positions at the University of Melbourne, Peking University (Endeavour Research Fellow), Fudan University, China Foreign Affairs University, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology and National Taiwan University. Dr Pan was educated at Peking University (LL.B. and LL.M.) and the Australian National University (PhD in Political Science and International Relations).

His research is informed by a broad range of theoretical and conceptual perspectives, including critical constructivism, poststructuraliam, relationalism, and quantum theory. He is interested in the questions of how the world is holographically entangled, and how a relational ontology of quantum holography may contribute, on the one hand, to a critical reflection on conventional International Relations theories and their ontological and normative assumptions, and on the other, to an alternative conception of international relations in general and China’s rise and great power relations in particular. His book Knowledge, Desire and Power in Global Politics: Western Representations of China’s Rise (Edward Elgar, 2012; Chinese edition, 2016) was translated and published in Chinese by Social Sciences Academic Press (SSAP) and won a 2016 SSAP Best Book Award. His articles have appeared in European Journal of International RelationsInternational Relations of the Asia-Pacific, Millennium: Journal of International Studies, Politics, Review of International Studies, and The Pacific Review, among others. Dr Pan supervises PhD students and welcomes inquiries from interested prospective students on relevant research topics.